Podcast : US media “forgets” that governing is for everyone

Democratic candidate for governor of Georgia says one thing, US media spins it as another – and not just the right wing media either.

An article on what Stacey Abrams actually said > Georgia GOP attacks Stacey Abrams … for speaking the truth (msnbc.com)

How Fox News covered the same speech > Stacey Abrams calls Georgia ‘worst state in the country to live’ | Fox News Video

The True Centre Podcast 011 – "The Cost Of Living Coalition March" The True Centre Podcast

My thoughts on the Irish Left in general and a march/rally in Dublin on Saturday in particular. Learn more about the Cost of Living Coalition here > https://www.facebook.com/COLCIreland — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thetruecentre/message
  1. The True Centre Podcast 011 – "The Cost Of Living Coalition March"
  2. The True Centre Podcast 010 – "Beware The Thirty Odd Percent"
  3. The True Centre Podcast 009 – US media "forgets" that governing is for everyone
  4. The True Centre Podcast 008 – Elon Musk helps me define 'true centre'
  5. The True Centre Podcast 007 – Happy 20th birthday TYT

Elon Musk graphic proves “left/right” depiction of politics is arbitrary

“Elon Musk is buying Twitter, blah, blah, yaddya yaddya.” I lead with this paragraph in case you think this article has anything to do with that.

For now I’m much more interested in this graphic that he posted on his soon-to-be playtoy

I don’t care what point he’s trying to make here, especially given he named one of his children “X Æ A-12” and chose to put a car into orbit. For me, this actually highlights two points he may not have intended.

  1. He clearly believes, like most uber rich probably do, that the world revolves around him. The entire human race is represented by three stick figures on each line and he is one of them.
  2. More importantly for this web page, these varying depictions of the “left/right” nature of political thought are completely different each time, which to me proves that it is completely arbitrary. If Elon is proclaiming that they have these definitions for these particular years, why can’t we attribute our own?

Which leads me conveniently back to the most important point I want to get across in this blog, and you will see me repeat it in several posts. If you come across FPP and don’t leave it at least knowing that I firmly believe this, then I will have failed.

In my humble opinion, no matter what year it is, the true centre of a line representing political ideology is one that contains people who want a democratically elected government to provide equal opportunities for all of its citizens. As you go to the right, you have people who are supporting increasing amounts of inequality. As you move to the left, you have people who are more interested in fighting/punishing those on the right than actually working to establish/maintain that equality. Any other depiction of what is defined by “left” and “right” is an attempt to distort, usually from the “right” because they represent a minority of people but currently have a lot of power which they use to influence the masses.

THIS is what I’d like to talk about when it comes to Elon Musk, not whether or not he wants to add an edit button,. JLP

The True Centre Podcast 011 – "The Cost Of Living Coalition March" The True Centre Podcast

My thoughts on the Irish Left in general and a march/rally in Dublin on Saturday in particular. Learn more about the Cost of Living Coalition here > https://www.facebook.com/COLCIreland — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thetruecentre/message
  1. The True Centre Podcast 011 – "The Cost Of Living Coalition March"
  2. The True Centre Podcast 010 – "Beware The Thirty Odd Percent"
  3. The True Centre Podcast 009 – US media "forgets" that governing is for everyone
  4. The True Centre Podcast 008 – Elon Musk helps me define 'true centre'
  5. The True Centre Podcast 007 – Happy 20th birthday TYT

PS : It seems The Young Turks agree in this video and of course they put their own spin on it which is worth a listen. But sure what do we know, we’re just “woke progressives” right????

Maddow is back, she’s at her best, and now we all need to learn the phrase “Eliminationist Rhetoric”

Rachel Maddow has been on hiatus for quite a while now, working on other projects which is a good thing for her because while her 5-nights-a-week MSNBC show is must watch TV, the “corporate Democrat” nature of the network clearly holds her back.

What makes her presentations so compelling, for me anyway, is that whatever the topical news subject might be covering, she not only goes back several steps in the timeline while researching it, she also seems to bring you through her own process of learning as well. So while she might open her show talking about something like the presidency of Boris Yelstin, her verbal corkboard shows takes you from there to the Q Anon conspiracy.

But far be it from me to provide anything else that might act as a “spoiler” for the classic Maddow experience contained within the following two videos, all that is left is for me to strongly recommend just watch them, enjoy and learn. JLP

“Biden’s First Year” (The True Centre Podcast Ep 4)

The True Centre Podcast 011 – "The Cost Of Living Coalition March" The True Centre Podcast

My thoughts on the Irish Left in general and a march/rally in Dublin on Saturday in particular. Learn more about the Cost of Living Coalition here > https://www.facebook.com/COLCIreland — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thetruecentre/message
  1. The True Centre Podcast 011 – "The Cost Of Living Coalition March"
  2. The True Centre Podcast 010 – "Beware The Thirty Odd Percent"
  3. The True Centre Podcast 009 – US media "forgets" that governing is for everyone
  4. The True Centre Podcast 008 – Elon Musk helps me define 'true centre'
  5. The True Centre Podcast 007 – Happy 20th birthday TYT

“My Brush With The Misinformation Nation” (The True Centre Podcast Ep 3)

I normally want these pods to be just 10 minutes but I go on a bit longer as I explain my side of the story after going down a COVID related twitter rabbit hole with Ewan McKenna on St Stephens’ Day.

Below you can see the tweet that got the “discussion” going.

The True Centre Podcast 011 – "The Cost Of Living Coalition March" The True Centre Podcast

My thoughts on the Irish Left in general and a march/rally in Dublin on Saturday in particular. Learn more about the Cost of Living Coalition here > https://www.facebook.com/COLCIreland — Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thetruecentre/message
  1. The True Centre Podcast 011 – "The Cost Of Living Coalition March"
  2. The True Centre Podcast 010 – "Beware The Thirty Odd Percent"
  3. The True Centre Podcast 009 – US media "forgets" that governing is for everyone
  4. The True Centre Podcast 008 – Elon Musk helps me define 'true centre'
  5. The True Centre Podcast 007 – Happy 20th birthday TYT

HERE ARE SOME OF THE REPLIES I GOT FROM EWAN’S MINIONS…

“Listen to those who know what they’re talking about!” is the shittest advice of 2021. Who? The corrupt rats on pharmas payroll? Media? Restriction junkies? My mate knows all about heroin, but I don’t listen to him when he tells me it’s class. I can think for myself, always.

Virtue signalling gobshite.

Wonder would Dr Harold Shipman’s patients agree? And Dr Jack Kevorkian. Dr Carl Clauberg, Dr Josef Mengele and Dr John Bodkin Adams to name a few ‘health’ experts.

Keep taking the OxyContin. It’s not addictive if you keep doubling the dose.

I know the drill..never question an expert. Ever. Under any circumstances. Even on matters which over lap with social policy. Nope never. Just obey. [reply > Not what I said but hey, see what you want to see, whatever gets you angry.]

Jeff, your wee nappy wearing mate blocked me before I could tell him some scientists and medical professionals I listen to.Pensive face Let him know.
Robert Malone (Inventor on mRNA vaxx tech) : [His work has focused on mRNA technology, pharmaceuticals, and drug repurposing research. During the COVID-19 pandemic, he has been criticized for promoting misinformation about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines.[
Mike Yeadon (Former VP at Pfizer) [Michael Yeadon is a British anti-vaccine activist[1][2] and retired pharmacologist who attracted media attention for making false or unfounded claims about the COVID-19 pandemic and the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.]
John Ioannidis
Sunetra Gupta

Martin Kulldorf
Luc Montagnier

“Ballymun regeneration” : what really happened as explained by resident in tweet thread & video

I have long been interested to know what actually happened in Ballymun – not enough to do extensive research mind you, and one notable sidebar from this thread is that if the were to meet me, his first impression might be to see me as some kind of “Rugby Dad/Newstalk Niall” hybrid, but still I was grateful to him for tweeting this extensive info so I thought I’d share it here. Check out the link at the end to watch the video if the embed isn’t working.

Everything below this line of the post was written or produced by the author in question. JLP

Since Ballymun comes up a lot in discussions of the housing crisis, here’s a thread debunking some of the most persistent myths/misconceptions/lies about the community.

(I made a film about this some years ago, but people were largely indifferent, so this is a capsule summary).

Rugby dads, professional gentrifiers and Newstalk Nialls generally reference Ballymun as a “knee-jerk response” to a housing crisis (mostly false), a utopian project (totally false) and a failed housing model (also false).

The truth is, Ballymun was the Irish state doing what it does “best” – the bare minimum of public provision it can get away with. There was no failure of utopian planning because there was no utopian planning. Promises of cinemas, bowling alleys and amenities were always false.

That said, the blocks themselves were built to a French system and were generally sound, bright and spacious.

Ours had a large living room with private balcony, a large bedroom, two smaller bedrooms, a bathroom with bath and constant hot water, and a decent-sized kitchen.

But it swiftly became apparent that Dublin Corporation (now Dublin City Council) – whose senior officials always resented the fact that the National Building Agency had been entrusted with the lucrative project – had no intention of providing even basic services or maintenance.

In the early years, the community itself plugged this gap. Communal areas were scrupulously maintained by residents. To the best of its ability, an impoverished community stood in for the absent state. It built structures of mutual support and recreation that endured for decades.

Eventually, however, successive economic crises overwhelmed residents. From the 80s onwards, several waves of heroin addiction swept over the area, on the heels of a prescriptions drugs epidemic.

A beleaguered community lost the ability to do the Corpo’s job for it.

While the plethora of community organisations rallied and survived, the area deteriorated physically and economically.

Ballymunners made numerous earnest attempts to engage the state over the heads of the Corpo, which had by now largely abandoned the area to its fate.

These heroic efforts kept the community above water, until, in the late 90s, government finally yielded to pressure and announced a Regeneration project (an earlier attempt in the early 90s having been abandoned at about 10% completion).

This was to be enacted by a new limited company wholly owned by Dublin Corporation – Ballymun Regeneration Limited (BRL).

Inspired by Blairite thinking/models from the UK (and shipping over some of the same personnel), BRL swiftly decided on total demolition of the high rises

It should be explained here that outright gentrification (displacement and replacement of the community by more affluent residents) was off the table for a variety of reasons; chiefly, the fact that the community itself had forced the state’s hand and had to be won over.

While BRL carried out an elaborate pantomime of consultation (within already-defined parameters), its mission became clear:

Since the area couldn’t be gentrified, an attempt would be made to gentrify its people instead.

This would entail the forcible destruction, not just of the physical infrastructure of the community (tower blocks, green spaces, centralised shopping areas, community centres etc), but of all communal experiences of life in Ballymun.

BRL was quite explicit about this. The purpose of the Regeneration was to liquidate the existing community of Ballymun, with its communal forms of solidarity, and to allow residents to be reborn as responsible, market-oriented individual consumers.

The hodge-podge of architectural styles (sidenote: between 1997 and 2014, BRL spent €98.7m on professional fees alone) were all designed to achieve this.

Gone were the sweeping open spaces and the central meeting places that had fostered a community.

In their place – isolated developments that encouraged, and enforced, suspicion and exclusion of all but one’s immediate neighbours.

Ballymun’s vast network of community organisations – from football clubs to legal aid to tenants’ associations – was systematically dismantled.

These relics of non-market community identity (as BRL saw them) were brought under the banner of a BRL-run Neighbourhood Council, which was run into the ground and dissolved within a couple of years.

A tangent before the conclusion – it is shameful that anyone still parrots BRL’s mantra of “mixed income housing”.

The thinking here (explicitly stated in Ballymun) is that well-adjusted middle-class residents act as role models for their feckless working-class neighbours – vile

The Regeneration was, by every metric except BRL’s own, an abject failure. Estimates of its cost vary from €1bn-€2bn.

Ballymun was destroyed – socially, economically and culturally. The private sector investment on which BRL had based its Blairite fantasies never materialised.

The moral of the story:

When you see planners, politicians and pundits warn of “creating new Ballymuns”, always remember that they, and people who think like them, were given 20 years and a blank cheque to “fix” Ballymun according to their own ideology.

They utterly failed.

What really stuck in their craw about Ballymun was not the widespread, visible poverty (after all, these people have created a city strewn with the tents of the homeless), but the forms of solidarity and resistance to market ideology which Ballymunners carved out for themselves.

So yeah, if a politician, planner or developer arrives in your town with a “regeneration masterplan”, run them out of there before it’s too late.

Progressive media slams progressive politicians

Cenk makes some good points here but I also felt he was missing something obvious when he claimed he couldn’t work out why the media treats the Joe Manchins differently to AOCs so I left this comment…

The reason the media applauds the Joe Manchins of this world is what I call “The Centrist Myth”. By drastically skewing the political spectrum and claiming the “centre” must lie exactly between the position of the two main US parties, they manage to look reasonable by supporting their efforts to hold up legislation.

By contrast, Progressives, who are labelled the “radical left”, don’t get afforded the same respect because going by this paradigm, it is up to them to move their position towards that false centre.

IMO the reality is that the Progressive platform, which has equal opportunity as its foundation, represents THE TRUE CENTRE. Everyone to the right is in favour of corporatism to different degrees. Everyone to the left of is too focus on “beating” or “punishing” the right. I know they are just words but they still have far-reaching consequences if we accept them in the way they are being presented.

What Trump actually said about disinfectant curing #COVID19 and why it’s important whatever the context

View this post on Instagram

… whatever the context.

A post shared by First Person Plural (@fppblog) on

Supposing we hit the body with a tremendous, whether it’s ultraviolet or just very powerful, light and I think you said that hasn’t been checked and you’re going to test it.  and then I said suppose you bring the light inside the body which you can do either through the skin or in some other way and I think you said you’re going to test that too. sounds interesting (doctor says something). then I see the disinfectant knocks out in a minute and there is a way we can do something like that by injection inside or almost a cleaning because as you see it gets in the lungs and it does a tremendous number on the lungs it would be interesting to check that use medical doctors but it sounds interesting to me….

… I once mentioned that maybe it does go away with heat and light and people don’t like that statement very much because the fake news didn’t like it at all I just threw it out as a suggestion and it seems like that’s the case

President Donald Trump

Leo should remain as Taoiseach for now but not without strong Opposition and challenging media #COVID19Ireland

These are unprecedented times.  Our worlds have been turned upside down and we have absolutely no idea what comes next.

I have been periodically blogging on this site for almost four years, and I have never made a secret of the fact that I believe in a Progressive government for Ireland.  This of course means the parties which have always represented the status quo such as Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil have never gotten my vote. I also have little faith in other parties purporting to be “left” such as Sinn Féin and Labour.

Yet when faced with a situation like COVID-19, I do not believe that a radical change to the face of our government is what is needed, even when it comes as it did right after a general election.  Leo Varadkar and Fine Gael were in power when it was time to lock the country down and particularly in the most relevant departments like those of An Taoiseach and Health, we need continuity and stability so regardless of political hue I think the correct course would be for them to remain for now.

Now I’m hoping that my established premise will be remembered as I voice some concerns over the current situation.  In his address to the nation on St Patrick’s Day, Leo Varadkar literally referenced Winston Churchill.

“This is the calm before the storm – before the surge.  And when it comes – and it will come – never will so many ask so much of so few.”

Address by An Taoiseach, Leo Varadkar 17th March

For the life of me I cannot fathom why there was not more of a backlash to this.  I am absolutely no fan of Sinn Féin but am I the only one who sees the irony in the fact that they would be lambasted for any kind of Nationalist references at this time yet our Taoiseach, one who has often expressed a liking for the leadership of one conservative UK leader in Thatcher, gets a free pass after throwing a nod to another?

This point is one of semantics and cosmetics I know, but I make it first because of the levels of reaction I have seen on social media ever since.  Of course we need to stick together as much as possible during these times, and given the original nature of the crisis there should be much leeway afforded to our government, yet the levels of praise for his leadership have been, in many, many cases, “Churchillian”, and this concerns, nay frightens me.  

Strong opposition and challenging media are important ingredients to any democracy.  If a day ever came when Ireland had Progressives seated around the Cabinet table, I would expect nothing less than for them to have their feet held to the fire where possible, and we all know that would be the case.

And while the Green Party did not get my vote at the last election either, I cannot understand why they are being vilified for not unconditionally joining FF and FG in government.  They claim to have offered three options to the “Civil War” parties, all of which have been rejected…

“I think the idea that FG and FF would present this narrow option to the people of the two of them in power with one of the smaller parties propping them up is very self-serving. It has the coincidental effect of giving them the most amount of power, for the most amount of time with the least amount of oversight.” 

Green TD Neasa Hourigan

Why are politicians so reluctant to form a government?
Justin McCarthy – RTÉ.ie

…and the backlash appears to be “shut up and get on board”. Whatever your levels of respect were for them before, surely they would be lowered should they accept those terms.  But this post is not just about the Green Party. It’s for the type of representative body we want the Dáil to be when it comes to acting as a check on our Government.

Then there is the Irish mainstream media, one that already had a reputation for being more stenographers than challengers.  And that was even before this particular Taoiseach came to power, one who sought in virtually his first act to set up a media arm with the sinister title of the “Strategic Communications Unit“.

Below are just some areas where I would like to ask questions of Leo Varadkar and his government, in no particular order:

  1. What exactly happened with those orders from China which arrived with inadequate supplies?
  2. If Opposition parties should feel shame for insisting that the Dáil convenes due to risk of social distancing among civil servants, have any measures been discussed to allow for some kind of COVID-19 friendly Dáil sittings until the crisis is over?
  3. COVID-19 tests – they are in limited supply.  Is there any transparency as to how they are allocated?  And I have heard stories that the testing itself can take over two weeks to produce results – why is that, is anything being done to speed up the process and is this fact reflected in the numbers we are being given?
  4. We have all has been adversely affected by this crisis, but that does not mean we will all be struggling by its end.  When everyone’s assets have been reduced, the priority of Government care should be those who are left with little or nothing.  So what exactly do you mean by “tough decisions” that have to be made once this crisis is over? Is there to be a period of austerity similar to that affected by the banking crisis or will the burden at very least shared regardless of wealth if not borne by the 1% at the top?  

I am happy for Leo and Simon to remain in their jobs.  I am delighted that Leo is rolling up his sleeves to pitch in as a GP.  That’s all great. But if a republic values its democratic principles, no government should go unchecked, and we certainly shouldn’t assume everything is rosy on these shores based on a comparison to the leadership of the blond buffoons either side of us.  All I’m asking is that we be mindful of this. JLP